The common duiker, Sylvicapra grimmia, also known as the grey or bush duiker, is a small antelope with small horns.
Colouration of this species varies widely over its vast geographic range. As many as 19 subspecies are thought to exist, ranging from chestnut to grizzled gray and light brown shades.
It grows to about 50 cm in height and generally weighs 12 to 25 kg (26 to 55 lb); although females are generally larger and heavier than the males. The males’ horns can grow to 11 cm long.
Breeding is year round and the female gives birth to one fawn after a gestation period of what is variously estimated at 3 to 7.5 months. The common duiker has a wide diet; beyond herbivorous browsing for leaves, flowers, fruits and tubers, they will also eat insects, frogs, small birds and mammals, and even carrion. As long as they have vegetation to eat (from which they get some water), they can go without drinking for very long periods. In the rainy season, they will frequently not drink water at all, instead obtaining fluids from fruits. They will often scavenge for these fruits below trees in which monkeys are feeding. They are active both day and night, but become more nocturnal near human settlements.

Image: Ranger Mariné Dippenaar